PEOPLE – Friends

We Hear You

10 August 2020

We Hear You provides free therapeutic support to children, families and individuals in Bath and North East Somerset, Somerset and Wiltshire affected by cancer and other life-threatening conditions.

WHY’s vision is a world where free access to high quality therapeutic support is available when and where it is needed for everyone affected by cancer and any other life-threatening conditions.



PEOPLE – Friends

The Mobius Hospice

25 October 2019

The Möbius Hospice is a new type of hospice that puts death and dying at the centre of a larger community. Möbius Hospice uses the motif of a Möbius strip to talk about death and dying as a continuum.



PEOPLE – Friends

IMH

25 July 2019

WCCEH is one of four Wellcome-funded centres that focus on research in the humanities and social sciences


Logo of the Institute for Medical Humanities

The Institute for Medical Humanities focusses on improving health by understanding the depth and breadth of human experience.



PEOPLE – Friends

CBSS

25 July 2019

WCCEH is one of four Wellcome-funded centres and institutes that undertake health-focussed research in the humanities and social sciences.


Logo of Centre for Biomedicine, Self and Society

 

The Centre for Biomedicine, Self and Society will explore new ways of integrating social science and humanities into the study of biomedicine, as well as new approaches to public and stakeholder engagement.

 



PEOPLE – Friends

Ethox

25 July 2019

WCCEH is one of four Wellcome-funded centres and institutes that undertake health-focussed research in the humanities and social sciences.


Logo of Ethox Centre

The Ethox Centre aims to improve ethical standards in healthcare practice and in medical research through education, research, and the provision of ethics support to health professionals and medical researchers.



PEOPLE – Friends

Wellcome Trust

22 July 2019

Logo of Wellcome TrustThe Centre is funded by a £4.1 million grant from the Wellcome Trust, matched by a £3 million investment from the University of Exeter. The refurbished space was officially opened in 2018.



PEOPLE – Friends

Wellbeing Exeter

5 July 2019

Wellbeing Exeter is a strategic alliance of public, voluntary and community sector organisations. We have come together to explore better ways of supporting the 40% of patients who visit their GP with social rather than medical problems.



PEOPLE – Friends

The Sensory Trust

5 July 2019

The Sensory Trust is a leading authority on inclusive and sensory design in the UK, using connections with nature and the outdoors to improve the health and wellbeing of people living with disability and health issues, their families and carers.



PEOPLE – Friends

Libraries Unlimited

5 July 2019

The vision of Libraries Unlimited is `Bringing ideas, imagination, information and knowledge to people’s lives and communities’.

 



PEOPLE – Friends

C2

5 July 2019

C2: Connecting Communities is the brand name of a unique and dynamic community engagement programme that has been transforming the health & social status of low-income communities in the UK since 1995.



PEOPLE – Friends

CoLab Exeter

5 July 2019

Colab Exeter is an integrated wellbeing and innovation hub that works in collaboration with agencies across sectors to strengthen local services and achieve positive whole community outcomes around homelessness, addiction, (re)offending, and health inequality.



PEOPLE – Friends

Arban

5 July 2019

Activity for Reformation of Basic Needs

ARBAN is a civil society organisation involved in socio-economic research and development activities in the Netrokona, Mymensingh, Jamalpur, Sylhet, Dhaka, Khulna, Bagerhat and Satkhira districts of Bangladesh.

ARBAN received one of the Centre’s first Research Initiation Awards, for the Voices from Durgapur project.



PEOPLE – Friends

AESOP

5 July 2019

Aesop is a not-for-profit charity and social enterprise. Aesop is a bridge-builder, connecting the worlds of health and the arts. It helps health harness the powers of the arts, and helps the arts gear up to deliver health improvement.



PEOPLE – Friends

ECEHH

5 July 2019

Core members of the Wellcome Centre (Lora Fleming, Karyn Morrissey and Ritadevi Aflatt) are also members of the European Centre for Environment and Human Health (ECEHH) based in Truro, at the University of Exeter Medical School.



PEOPLE – Friends

WHO

5 July 2019

The World Health Organization set up the Collaborating Centre initiative in recognition that expert academic advice is often needed to meet the key aims and objectives set out as part of WHO’s strategic priorities.

WHO Collaborating Centre for Culture and Health



PEOPLE – Friends

Ayesha Nathoo

4 July 2019

Biography

I am an Honorary Senior Research Fellow with the Wellcome Centre, following a Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship in the Centre for Medical History at the University of Exeter.

I am a cultural historian of medicine and my work is positioned in the growing interdisciplinary field of the medical humanities. My most recent research has examined the growth of contemporary therapeutic relaxation practices, in relation to chronic-disease prevention, stress and pain-management, and health and wellbeing advocacy.

I have a BA in Natural Sciences and an MPhil in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine from the University of Cambridge, where I also undertook my PhD (King’s College), and a Research Fellowship in Arts and Humanities (Clare Hall). My past major work focused on the heart, organ transplantation, and the relationship between medicine and the media. I am the author of Hearts Exposed: Transplants and the Media in 1960s Britain (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Highlights of my career to date

An early highlight was when my first book, Hearts Exposed, was shortlisted for the Royal Historical Society’s Whitfield Prize for the best new book on British history.

In recent years, a major highlight has been broadening my horizons and reaching new audiences through collaborating on a wide range of projects and public events across the arts, sciences and humanities. These have included leading workshops at the Secret Garden Party, Wilderness and Green Man festivals, and the Mile End Arts Pavilion. Many of these ventures took form when I was a collaborator (2014-16) with the interdisciplinary Hubbub group at the Wellcome Collection, exploring notions of rest and busyness in urban living. Gaining a Research Fellowship at the Science Museum in London the following year, to help develop an exhibition on ‘immortality’, was another particularly enriching experience.

The research I will be undertaking in the Centre

I will be extending my research to develop a new project on holistic healthcare and notions of healing.

Something about me you can’t Google!

I absolutely love African drumming and have a collection of djembes.

 



PEOPLE – Friends

Ray Earwicker

4 July 2019

Biography

I was a senior policy adviser at the Department of Health for 25 years (1992-2017). Before that, I worked at the Trades Union Congress (health and social policy adviser), the Health Education Authority (alcohol policy manager) and Birmingham University (social policy lecturer). I am a graduate of Warwick and Birmingham universities.  My doctorate was on the Labour Movement and the Creation of the NHS 1890-1948 (University of Birmingham).

Highlights of my career to date

At the Department of Health, I led on the social determinants of health agenda, including cross-government collaboration on housing and homelessness, troubled families, early years and school policies, the health inequalities strategy focusing on infant mortality, and international health, including working with WHO and the EU. I chaired the EU Equity Action project on addressing health inequalities across the union (2011-14). I was private secretary to the Director of Research and Development (1995-97), secretary to the Acheson Independent Inquiry on Inequalities of Health (1998) and DH lead for the Marmot Fair Society, Healthy Lives report (2010). At the TUC, I led on emerging AIDS/HIV workplace programmes (1986-88), including working with WHO.

Why I am associated with the Centre

I am a policy adviser supporting a number of projects. These include the DeStress project, which examines the impact of poverty on mental health through the lives of people in disadvantaged communities; the Patient Experience project, looking at the engagement of young people and their families in Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services; and the NHS at 70 project. I am a blogger and regular contributor to the Cultural Contexts of Health website (e.g. what can a singing cowboy teach us about policymaking?)

 



PEOPLE – Friends

Rachel Purtell

4 July 2019

Rachel is the Centre’s Critical Friend

Her role is to support the creation of an engaged research culture, in which people who have first-hand experience of the issues or difficulties are at the heart of all the Centre’s research activities.

 



PEOPLE – Friends

Ann Grand

2 July 2019

My background

I’ve had a ‘portmanteau’ career that’s taken me everywhere from school science teaching, to voluntary work, to being a company director, to freelance editing and a lot in between.

I started my working life as a science teacher in secondary schools in Derbyshire and Devon. While teaching, I took my undergraduate degree with the Open University. After leaving that career, I spent several years in a mix of writing educational and games software, technical authoring, co-director of a small company and voluntary work. In 2009, I went back to university to research for a PhD in open science and public engagement. Since then, I have worked as a researcher and lecturer in the University of the West of England, Bristol, the Open University and the University of Western Australia.

Between 2017 and 2019, I was the Centre’s Senior Lead for Engaged Research and Public Engagement, supporting members of the Centre, and people in groups and organisations outside the Centre, to plan, carry out, collaborate in and evaluate engaged research.

I’ve been a volunteer in the international Café Scientifique movement since 2003. Since 2010, I’ve been the closest thing the network has to a leader; I advise, support and mentor café organisers around the world and maintain the network’s website.

I’m proud that I took a deep breath and risked going back to university to study for a PhD as a (very) mature student, and that I started a new and rewarding career in research and teaching when most of my contemporaries are retiring!

Something about me you can’t Google

I helped build a robot that is now in the permanent collection of the Science Museum, London.



PEOPLE – Friends

Nick Groom

25 June 2019

Biography

I was educated at the University of Oxford, graduating with a double first in English Language and Literature followed by a DPhil in eighteenth-century literature.

I took up a full-time teaching appointment at the University of Exeter in 1992 and wrote five books before taking up a visiting professorship at Stanford University and then moving to the University of Bristol.

At Bristol I established the Centre for Romantic Studies and worked with colleagues in immunology and public health and, as general editor, published work on sexuality, diet, and science in the period 1750-1850. While at Bristol I was made a visiting professor at the University of Chicago, and then returned to Exeter as a professor.

I founded ECLIPSE (the Exeter Centre for Literatures of Identity, Place, and Sustainability) and co-founded AARP (the Atlantic Archipelagos Research Project, now a consortium: AARC). Both ECLIPSE and AARC have influenced my work on intangible cultural heritage, published in The Seasons (shortlisted for the Katharine Briggs Folklore Award and runner-up for BBC Countryfile Book of the Year 2014).

Since then I have been awarded a Leverhulme Fellowship and a Lewis Walpole Fellowship to research the Gothic. My work on both intangible cultural heritage and the Gothic has led me to the cultures and environments of health, and I am currently writing a history of the Gothic as well as a forensic history of vampires. My anniversary edition of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein was published in 2018 by Oxford University Press.

The research I will be undertaking in the Centre

My first project is to assemble an interdisciplinary team to re-evaluate accounts of vampirism from the perspectives of social science, medicine, and theology, linking to ethical questions of vivisection, cross-species experimentation, transplantation, and inoculation, and more broadly to diet and wellbeing, trauma and anxiety, and mass delusion.

I am also investigating the relationship between intangible cultural heritage and wellbeing, particularly in small communities, coastal regions, and islands.

Something about me you can’t Google!

During my research into eighteenth and nineteenth-century attitudes to the body I acquired a Victorian biscuit barrel made out of a human skull; I don’t, however, use it for biscuits.



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